Free Diaper Cover Pattern

I’ve been working on this ever since I got a request to do a special set for a photo shoot. I’ll eventually have the skirt available as well, but all I have written up is the diaper cover. It’s the part that’s under the skirt in the picture linked above.

I really like this because of the texture that’s created by the use of sc and dc. Another reason to like this, is that I’ve worked out the math, so you only have 2 basic rows to repeat and there are no increases or decreases. The edging is the trickiest part. I found this graduated stitch technique in the book Crochet That Fits, by Mary Jane Hall. You can find her on Ravelry.com or read her blog: positivelycrochet.blogspot.com

This diaper cover is made all in one piece and graduates in size to fit around the baby’s bottom and belly, and narrows between the legs. It also narrows at the top, with some elasticity for a more snug fit.

Newborn Diaper Cover

For this project, I used:

Worsted Weight Yarn, less than a skein

I Hook

Yarn Needle

slip stitch, single crochet, double crochet

Gauge: this one is a little hard to explain, but here goes, the first six rows in the textured area of the cover is just under 2 inches, but the slip stitches at the waist area is only 1.25 inches.

Leaving a 15″ tail for sewing, chain 45

Row 1: In this row only, use the back bump, not the top loop of the stitch. slip stitch in second back bump from the hook; sl st in the next 4 stitches, sc in the next bump, dc in the next bump, repeating the sc, dc for 5 more stitches, ending on a sc; sl st in the next 20 back bumps; dc in the next bump, sc in the next, repeating the dc, sc for 5 more stitches, ending on a dc; sl st in the next 5 bumps; ch. 1 turn. 44 stitches

From here and through out, only stitch in the blo of all slip stitches, use both loops for the singles and doubles.

Row 2: sl st in the next 5 stitches using blo; sc in the next stitch, using both loops, dc in the next, using both loops, repeat the dc, sc for 5 more stitches, ending on a sc; sl st in the next 20 stitches, blo; dc in the next stitch, sc in the next, repeat the dc and sc for 5 more stitches ending on a dc; sl st in the next 5 stitches, blo. ch 1, turn. 44 stitches.

For quick reference, your row should go like this:

5 sl; sc dc sc dc sc dc sc (7); 20 sl; dc sc dc sc dc sc dc (7); 5 sl

Row 3: repeat row 2

Row 4: sl st in the next 5 stitches using blo; sc in the next stitch, using both loops, dc in the next, using both loops, repeat for 9 more stitches, ending on a sc; sl st in the next 12 stitches, blo; dc in the next stitch, sc in the next, repeat the dc and sc for 9 more stitches ending on a dc; sl st in the next 5 stitches, blo. ch 1, turn. 44 stitches.

Your row should go like this:

5 sl; sc dc sc dc sc dc sc dc sc dc sc (11); 12 sl; dc sc dc sc dc sc dc sc dc sc dc (11); 5 sl

Rows 5-15: Repeat row 4

Rows 16-18: Repeat row 2

Row 19: slip stitch in each stitch across, blo.

Leaving a 15″ tail, fasten off.

Finishing: fold the piece, putting the edges together. With the edges upward, you should see your pants take shape. Working from the edges downward, using the tail, sew the sides closed, using a whip stitch around the outside loops of the stitches. Or you can stitch the sides closed in a way that you might find more comfortable. Work your way down closing the sides, leaving enough stitches for the leg openings. I only went into the top two slip stitches and left the rest.  I turned mine, right side out, preferring the look of the seems on the other side. Weave in the ends and you’re done!

I’m including a diagram, smdiapercover, for the newborn/small pattern.

I have every intention of writing other sizes, but my crochet/writing time is now shared with part time employment and some graphic design freelance work. I can however, tell you that you can adjust this pattern to fit larger babies. You can lengthen each differing stitch sections of the rows. Experiment with the length by increasing the those sections. The one thing I would encourage you to do, is that your sc/dc section always needs to be an odd number. This keeps the pattern to a point of simplicity repeating the same row, once you get past the edging. Feel free to comment or email me with questions.

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About Dana

Creative Thinker, Crafter, Designer
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4 Responses to Free Diaper Cover Pattern

  1. Jo-Ellen says:

    Hi, I dont quite understand what you mean on the first row ‘repeating the dc?’. I end up with way more than 44 stitches??

    • Dana says:

      Hi Jo-Ellen. Thanks for trying out my pattern. I’m sorry you are having some issues. I won’t have a chance to properly answer your question until tomorrow evening but for now, I’d suggest looking at the diagram included on this blog post. It might give you some clarity in the mean time.

  2. Jo-Ellen says:

    uh huh! I didn’t notice there was a diagram. I think I will manage now. Thank you!

  3. Dana says:

    Reblogged this on The Cotton Gin and commented:

    Let’s revisit this free pattern for diaper covers. It’s the same concept as the Textured Headband using slip stitches in combination with the textured rows to create the shaping.

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